In his book, Avraham Ben-Zvi, a professor of political science at the University of Haifa who has been studying U.S. foreign policy for almost four decades, presents the development of the relationship between Israel and the United States and its patterns duri...

The article clarifies constructivism’s claims, outline the differences between conventional and critical constructivism, and suggest a research agenda that both provides alternative understandings of mainstream international relations puzzles and offers a few ...

The article is an examination and survey of literature on political economy of low growth despite of an abundant resource, which is called resource curse. The author tackles the issue in three parts. In the first part, he reviews the economic explanations of r...

Existing literature on resource curse provide economic explanations. The author argues that political foundations of resource curse should be studied as well. The article emphasizes that political decisions matter because they determine whether resource wealth...

The main thesis of the authors is that scholars tend to focus on the UN missions in peacebuilding and ignore the role donor countries play. They argue that bilateral donors and the conditionalities they place are crucial in peacebuilding processes. They take M...

Chapter 1: TransnationalAdvocacy Networks in International Politics: Introduction   A transnationa ladvocacy network includes those relevant actors working internationally on an issue, who are bound to gether by shared values, a common discourse, and den...

Chain-gang:  Each state feels its own security is integrally intertwined with the security of its alliance partners. Any nation that marches to war inexorably drags its alliance partners with it. No state can sit out the conflict, since the former’s demise wou...

Moravcsik lays out liberalism as a theory of international politics and discusses basic assumptions and how it differs from existing theories.   For liberals, the configuration of state preferences matters most in world politics – not, as realists argue, th...