Article offers an evolutionary model of how the relationship between two adversaries moves toward or away from rivalry over time, emphasizing the changing context of their relations and the influence of both past events and prospect of future interaction.  ...

Point:  Action-reaction in crisis is radically different in rivalries than in regular conflict.  Rivalry not only makes escalation and crises more likely, but also significantly interacts with more traditional predictors of conflict such as capability ratios, ...

Point:  There are some rivalries that do not enter war with each other. The article explains that if rivalries do not escalate to war then there are no territorial disputes between them. Rivals not in territorial disputes engage in war only by participating in...

Realists do share certain assumptions and are often treated as a group, but such a broad grouping obscures systematic divisions within realist theory. In this article the author argues that realism can be split into two competing branches by revealing latent d...

In this article, Keohane emphasizes that international institutions are an important variable in world politics, worth studying. Since they facilitate cooperation that is not always benign and without institutions there will be little cooperation. While sticki...

What unites critical theorists is a concern with how world politics is "socially constructed,"  which involves two basic claims: that the fundamental structures of international politics are social rather than strictly material (a claim that opposes materialis...

Bellamy explores international engagement with and intervention debates on Darfur in order to understand if the 2003 war in Iraq has caused any changes to the norm of humanitarian intervention. He basically argues that Darfur crisis can show us two subtle chan...

The article clarifies constructivism’s claims, outline the differences between conventional and critical constructivism, and suggest a research agenda that both provides alternative understandings of mainstream international relations puzzles and offers a few ...

Chain-gang:  Each state feels its own security is integrally intertwined with the security of its alliance partners. Any nation that marches to war inexorably drags its alliance partners with it. No state can sit out the conflict, since the former’s demise wou...

Moravcsik lays out liberalism as a theory of international politics and discusses basic assumptions and how it differs from existing theories.   For liberals, the configuration of state preferences matters most in world politics – not, as realists argue, th...